Residential

Rueter Associates Architects

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Fifth Avenue Penthouse

The penthouse of the Fifth Avenue Building frames urban prospects from a stylish refuge located in the heart of downtown Ann Arbor. A balcony on the front of the building provides a commanding view of the street while the rear deck offers a quiet outdoor sanctuary. The space between flows freely from room to room with thoughtful details around every corner. In the living room cantilevered shelves feature integrated lighting to showcase collectibles, while cherry cabinets conceal the entertainment center on the other side of the granite hearth. Cherry cabinets, granite counter-tops, and iridescent glass tiles accent the kitchen with refinement and flare. A skylit gallery connects the entertainment spaces to the more private rooms at the rear of the residence. The master suite has a large walk-in closet and a bathroom lined with translucent amber glass tiles. The guest suite and study provide additional space within this roof-top enclave.

Soper Renovation

This residential remodeling and addition on a secluded wooded lot in Ann Arbor was intended to provide space for entertaining friends and family as well as more intimate areas for everyday living in which the orchid room would serve as the primary setting. A circulation spine runs the length of the house from the new entrance to an extension of the gathering room at the opposite end. A cantilevered shelf above the foyer creates a threshold at the transition to the vaulted ceiling of the hallway beyond. The shelf continues as a datum that weaves the existing and new spaces together.

After passing by the kitchen the lowered ceiling of the formal dining room creates a sense of compression prior to the gathering room in which the ceiling vaults again to a sky lit ridge. Large windows at the opposite end open the view to the woods beyond. Simple details and airy spaces combine to create a welcoming, light-filled residence in the woods.

Rueter Associates Architects

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Rueter Associates Architects

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Bell Residence

The design for this new residence in rural Kentucky was based upon a typical pioneering myth.

In this version the log home was the first structure on the property and served as a shelter to establish a homestead.

The stone Georgian house and frame link were added later once the endeavor had proven prosperous.

Weinmann Block Residence

This condominium in the historic Weinmann Building straddles the brick wall of adjacent historic buildings with different floor levels. The lower level includes the foyer and guest quarters, while the upper level accommodates the primary living spaces, a study, and the master suite. Reveals in the walls strike a datum above each floor and slide over the door casings to circle each room and define shelves above the kitchen and entertainment cabinets. Three skylights allow natural light to wash the brick wall of the hallway and filter into the kitchen, the guest bedroom, and the master bath.

Rueter Associates Architects

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Rueter Associates Architects

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Easudes Residence

Steve and Anna Easudes wanted to create an intimate rural place that could accommodate animals, fruit trees and kitchen gardens. The place should feel as if it had been there for a long time. The early Greek Revival homesteads with small outbuildings and modestly proportioned houses were particularly appealing to the Easudes. Steve was particularly interested in the "Plymouth House," a Greek Revival house in Greenfield Village. This house had simple vernacular additions added over time. With drawings of the Plymouth House from the Henry Ford Archives and after visits to over 20 Greek Revival homesteads from Marshall, Michigan to Plymouth, Michigan, a site plan and architectural design were developed. The house and barn sit well back from the road. The white house is silhouetted by the red barn and a giant field oak. The story-and-a-half main house has a hipped roof side wing common in Midwest Greek Revival with vernacular kitchen and mudroom wings. The rooms are simple and extremely well lighted with deep windows on usually two walls. Furniture replaces closets throughout the house. In the large kitchen only the sink is attached to the wall. The kitchen garden is just out the back door next to the rear porch and the sheep can be seen through the north kitchen window. -Place Magazine, Fall 1994

Knott Residence

John and Anne Knott wanted a home with a rural, quiet setting. This 2,200 square foot 1-1/2 story residence has only one bedroom proper, but has other spaces capable of accommodating visiting children and grandchildren. This rustic house employs simple massing, broad overhangs with decorative rafter ends, and intricately detailed doors and windows. An Arts and Crafts design motif echoes throughout the house from the divided lite doors to the ceramic tile floors. Natural materials were used -wood, tile, stone, and concrete. The south-facing site with its magnificent stand of red pines played a key role in the design. The architect and the Knotts wanted to bring the pines "into" the house in some way. This was accomplished by opening a portion of the living room ceiling with skylights so that a view of an entire tree from base to top could be captured. Other trees were milled for heavy timbers, wood flooring, ceilings, cabinets, and wainscoting. -Excerpt from the Huron Valley Chapter/AIA and the Michigan Architectural Foundation tour brochure.

Rueter Associates Architects

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Rueter Associates Architects

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Eberwhite Renovation

The existing wrought iron porch and concrete floor were demolished and replaced by a new craftsman inspired porch. The design was consistent with the Craftsman style details of the existing house. New front living room windows were also added. The kitchen was extensively remodeled in a retro 1950s style.

Price Residence

The design combined colonial and Victorian shapes and details to make a weekend house for two families. The house is located on a small lot outside of town on the western bluff of the island. This house was adapted from a design named the Gummere House from Alex Wade's book, Guide to Affordable Houses (Rodale Press, 1984). The final design ended up doubling the size of Wade's design, then by adding an octagonal tower as a third floor and altering window placement and siding details, the saltbox shape was given more of a Shingle-style Victorian character. The two-story east facade is Cape Cod in nature, and the west facade is a saltbox silhouette. The Victorian tower was inspired by the octagonal lantern on a nearby lighthouse, and from the Fort Mackinac tower. Because on the island cars and trucks are not permitted, most of the building materials were brought to the island by ferry. Then at the dock, they were loaded onto dray wagons pulled by teams of horses. The house was built using a post-and-beam structure, with conventional rafters. Some red pine growing on the bluff was used from the site. -Excerpts from an article by Don Price published by Fine Homebuilding

Rueter Associates Architects

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Rueter Associates Architects

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Wieder Residence

This Linwood home was charming. However, the kitchen and eating area were small and there was no media room. The program called for adding approximately 700 square feet of first and second floor space across the back of the house. Downstairs the kitchen would be tripled in size, a half bath moved, and a new den built. A small porch and mudroom area were also required. The back of the house was to become a secondary entrance from the detached garage and was visible from the street. Therefore, an entry fitting the simplified 1920s Tudor house was designed.

Wurster Park Home

Previous schematic design work by RAA converted this parkside duplex to a single family home and opened up some interior space. This space was enhanced in a sunroom addition. The goal was to optimize the amount of windows and improve the backyard access for entertaining. Bi-parting patio doors and large windows connect to the outdoors, and a wood-burning fireplace warms up the room in the winter. The height and roof proportions of the sunroom were designed to balance the existing two-story portion of the house. Exterior steel detailing provides a modern touch and adds necessary structural stability.

Rueter Associates Architects

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Rueter Associates Architects

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Cantilever Tales

The Goetsch-Winkler house in Okemos, Michigan, one of Frank Lloyd Wright’s most successful Usonian designs was in need of roof repairs. Built in 1939, it was experimental in its construction, and it has undergone several repairs – the first in 1957. There were three areas of concern; however, only the first two were addressed due to the modest budget. First, the framing for the south-west facing studio windows was considerably out of plumb. Second, the tar and gravel roof showed cracks and some leakage and considerable sag was noticed in the cantilevered roof over the carport. Third, the brick foundation for the garden wall showed deflection and some cracks.

–Excerpts from an article by Don Price published in Old-House Journal

Seventh Street Renovation

Owners at this Old West Side home desired an improved arrival and informal entry to their Queen Anne style house. A shed roof addition was removed to allow a covered porch along the entire back of the house. A pergola connects the porch to the carport. Craftsman detailing, a ceiling fan, and period-style light fixtures create an gracious new outdoor space.

Rueter Associates Architects

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Rueter Associates Architects

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111 Kingsley Lane

This model unit was designed and built for the Kingsley Lane Lofts development within the existing building on the project site. The former home of a meat market was renovated to market a loft aesthetic to potential homeowners. The open floor plan was designed with spaces similar to the condominium units and features details destined for the final cut of the project.

Family Friendly Kitchen

This project for a busy family expanded upon a small kitchen by appropriating an existing screen porch and eliminating an awkward secondary entrance. Under the existing roofline a new floor allows the bustling kitchen to expand into a study area for the young family while creating a connection to a once remote study. A built-in bench incorporates additional storage for children’s games while two walls of windows allow prospects to the adjacent park. A rebuilt porch provides access to bring groceries from the driveway.

Rueter Associates Architects

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Rueter Associates Architects

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Newport Revelry

This contemporary craftsman inspired residence blends builderly details with refined artistic flare. The exterior features craftsman details which feel at home in the woods and the play of light and shadow through the trees.

The interior offers a spacious floor plan and clean lines to accentuate the owner’s vibrant glass and painting collection while accommodating festive soirees. A large deck on the rear brings interior and exterior together, allowing guests to overflow when necessary and mingle in the woods.

Preservation Projects

Lund Residence

This Ann Arbor early Greek Revival brick house was extensively remodeled with a new master bedroom and kitchen. The porch structure was also reconstructed with new parts milled to match the old ones. A new garage consistent with Greek Revival architecture replaced the existing rotting garage. The water tower roof was restored as well. Additional work was done in 2005 to convert part of an upstairs apartment to a sitting room for the homeowners and an historic stairway was restored using original woodwork.

Tamason Dupuis Residence

The Tamason Dupuis residence is located on a prominent and windy site on the Trinity harbourfront called Hog’s Nose. The history of this house is sketchy. The earliest written record is a bill of sale dated 1911. However, the owners believe the house to have been built in approximately 1885 as when walls were stripped they found newspaper dating close to this time period.

Restoration started with reinforcement of the main floor structure by installing a new central beam and piers under the house and replacement of rotten sill plates. The linhay was rebuilt according to its original design. The original 12/12 roof was also re-built and traditional cedar roofing shingles were installed. All exterior clapboard was replaced and all windows and doors as well. Windows were locally crafted to replicate the original windows in the house. Wide corner boards with beaded edges replaced the deteriorated ones.

– from the Newfoundland Historic Trust, 2004 Southcott Award